OKC Criminal Defense Attorneys
(405) 593-8444
OKC Criminal Defense Attorneys
(405) 593-8444

7 Things You Need to Know in the Early Stages

What You Need To Know In The Early Stages Of Your Involvement In The Criminal Court System.

A 7-Part Video Series to help guide you through the criminal justice system in Oklahoma.

These videos are specifically made for people facing charges in Oklahoma County (Oklahoma City and Edmond), Canadian County (El Reno, Yukon, and Mustang), and Cleveland County (Norman and Moore).

VIDEO 1

What to do if you have a Criminal Case Warrant in Oklahoma

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

What to Do If You Have a Criminal Case Warrant in Oklahoma

 

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

If you have an active warrant - you need to act fast!  By trying to take care of the warrant asap, you can make a bad situation at least a little bit better.

There are multiple ways that you could find out that you have an active warrant for your arrest, which include: via the Internet, from a friend or relative, your local news, a police officer, you may receive a letter from an attorney, and you can even conduct a name search on the Oklahoma State Court Network website (oscn.net).

Not all warrants will appear on oscn, but this is one place to check.

If you have an active warrant, you have three options to resolve the situation.

The first is to seek the help of a bondsman. For a fee (typically 10% of the amount your bail is set at), a bondsman can guide you through the process of a “walk through,” which enables you to choose (within a reasonable amount of time) when you report to authorities. At that point, the bondsman will post your bond. 

Secondly, if you have the funds, you can post a cash bond, which means you pay the full amount of your bail (instead of paying 10% to a bondsman).

Finally, if you have hired an attorney, your attorney can attempt to get your bond reduced. And they may even be able to get you released on your own recognizance. This means you won’t have to pay money to secure your bond, instead, you are released based upon your promise to appear in court at all scheduled court appearances. 

If you have questions, or need help with an active warrant, contact us today at 405-593-8444.

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

VIDEO 2

What is Going to Happen at My Arraignment?

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

What is going to happen at my arraignment?

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

What is an arraignment? An arraignment is a court date where you are informed of the charges against you. 

The arraignment process depends on which county you have been charged in, as well as your individual situation. Are you in jail? Have you been bonded out?

Below is a brief illustration of how counties in this area handle the arraignment process differently.

Oklahoma County: Arraignments in Oklahoma County are always held at 1:30 on the fifth floor of the Oklahoma County Courthouse.  If charges have not been filed yet, the judge will reschedule your arraignment date to see if the charges have been filed by that later date. If charges have been filed, you will receive a copy of the "Information," which shows the charges filed against you, as well as your next court date.

Cleveland County: Cleveland County’s arraignment process is a little different then Oklahoma County’s. In Cleveland County, if you have been arrested and bonded out, the court requests that you come to the courthouse within 10 days. If charges have been filed but you have not been arrested, then you need to take care of the warrant. *See outstanding warrant info above.*

Canadian County: Arraignments in Canadian County are held only once a month.

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

  • The above procedures are subject to change.

VIDEO 3

Should I Talk to the Police if I have Been Arrested?

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

Should I talk to the police if I have been arrested?

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

Our General Guidelines for communicating with the police:

Part of your Miranda Rights is that “you have the right to remain silent.” 

Every situation is different, but speaking from her experience as both a prosecutor and a criminal defense attorney, Ms. Fassio has seen very few instances where a suspect communicating to the police has benefitted that person.

You always have the right to communicate with an attorney before making the decision of whether or not it might be in your best interests to communicate with the police and make a statement.

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

VIDEO 4

Tips to Find the Best Attorney for Your Criminal Case

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

Tips to find the best attorney for your criminal case.

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

There are numerous factors you should consider in finding the best attorney for YOU and your specific situation.

You can follow this link to obtain access to the guide Ms. Fassio references during the video: https://fassiolaw.com/top10tips/ . The following provides a brief summary of the guide.

Top 10 Tips to find the best attorney for your criminal case.

1. We recommend hiring an attorney who exclusively practices criminal defense,

2. And has experience in criminal law.  

3. It matters how YOU feel about the attorney, not how the person who recommended them feels about the attorney.   

4. Look for an attorney who communicates and cares about client input.

5. Find someone who is creative!

6. More does not always mean better- make sure you are seeking an attorney who you are compatible with financially.

7. An attorney’s reputation matters. Look online at reviews, etc.

8. Find an attorney who will give your case the attention it deserves.

9. It is important to find someone with a good work ethic.

10. One of the most important requirements to keep in the back of your mind is to only hire an attorney YOU trust!

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

VIDEO 5

Tips to Find the Best Attorney for Your Criminal Case

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

How much does a criminal defense attorney cost?

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

This video is to help give you an idea of the factors that are considered when an attorney is providing you an estimate for total cost of their services. Different attorneys charge differently, but there are a few factors that are very common for most criminal attorneys.

Our website has a “fee calculator” that can be used as a general guideline for determining legal fees. https://fassiolaw.com/feecalculator/ 

In criminal defense in Oklahoma, it is most common for attorneys to charge a flat fee instead of an “hourly fee.” A flat fee, or a fixed rate, can be helpful in that you know from the start how much legal services are going to cost.  

Some common factors that will affect the fee include whether you were charged with a felony or a misdemeanor, what type of charges (drug charges, gun charge, assault etc.), and if you have been arrested for a crime before.  

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

VIDEO 6

What is Going to Happen When I Go to Court for My Criminal Case?

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

What is going to happen when I go to court for my criminal case?

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

Our Guide (can be found here) gives a more detailed explanation, however this video gives a brief summary of what to expect at the courthouse.

The court’s proceedings will depend on which courthouse you are in. Different counties handle things differently. The location may affect the process for the arraignment, and then after the arraignment you will have a conference date. This can be referred to as a disposition, a preliminary hearing conference, and others based on which courthouse it is being handled at.

At the conference date, this is where your attorney will probably request discovery for your case, as well as provides a chance for your attorney to communicate with the prosecutor.

If you were charged with a felony, you are entitled to a preliminary hearing. A preliminary hearing is when the state puts on evidence to show that there is probable cause that 1) a crime was committed, and 2) the named defendant is the person that committed the crime. This is a very low burden, and a majority of the time the state is successful with this low threshold. After preliminary hearing, you will be set for pre-trial conference.  

How will the case actually resolve?

There are several ways that a criminal case can end, or resolve. They include:

  • An agreed plea (you reach an agreement with a prosecutor),
  • A blind plea (a judge determines your sentence),
  • There may be some motions that are dispositive leading to dismissal, or
  • A (jury) trial.

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.

VIDEO 7

What You Need to Know FAST After a DUI Arrest in Oklahoma

(Early Stages of Criminal Court, Video Series)

What you need to know fast after a DUI arrest in Oklahoma?

*If you prefer to read, instead of watch the video above, here are the highlights:

A DUI arrest sparks a few specific things you must address immediately.

With a DUI, you will have two separate cases pending with two separate entities.

One will be the criminal charge itself,

and the other will involve the Department of Public Safety (DPS), which deals with your drivers license.

In regard to DPS and your license, any amount of alcohol in the system of someone under the age of 21 while operating a vehicle can lead to losing your license. If you are over the age of 21, DPS will be triggered if you had a BAC over .08 when pulled over, or if you refuse to take the test.

There are two ways to prevent revocation of a license. This can be done through an appeal by filing in the district court, or by participating in the Impaired Driver Accountability Program (IDAP)- both must be initiated within 30 days.

For more information about revocation of your driving privilege, click here to read the statute.

Another thing to keep in mind: If there is video surveillance of the incident/arrest, you may want to act quickly to ensure that you are able to obtain a copy of the video; whether it be on private property or through officer body-cam footage, etc.

Information courtesy of Defense Attorney Marcy Fassio at Fassio Law.